@RightPatient Hosting This Week’s #HITsm Tweetchat on Patient Identification in Healthcare

RightPatient will host this week's #HITsm tweet chat on patient identifciation and data matching

Join RightPatient™ on February 7th to discuss patient identification and data matching during the weekly #HITsm Tweet chat.

Often considered one of if not the most important challenges to overcome in healthcare, the topic of establishing an increase in accurate patient identification and data matching has seen a significant rise in urgency over the past year as more health IT initiatives are launched.

Despite the recent collaboration by the ONC and other entities on recommendations to the industry via findings from a study to assess current industry capabilities for matching patients with their health information, a lot needs to be accomplished in order to raise patient identification and data matching accuracy and many questions still remain on how soon this may come to fruition for the industry.

In order to raise more awareness of the difficulties to establish any type of meaningful changes across the industry for patient identification and data matching, we asked the good folks @HealthStandards who administer the weekly #HITsm tweet chat, if we could offer the topic of patient identification and data matching as a topic of discussion. We are excited to report that this week’s chat (follow #HITsm on Twitter) will be dedicated to patient identification and data matching!

The chat will be held this Friday, from 12 pm – 1pm EDT and those who wish to participate can find more details on the chat as well as the topics that will be discussed by visiting the HealthStandards Web site.

Interested in participating in the discussion? Join us this Friday at 12pm and follow hashtag #HITsm to learn more and give your two cents on the topic.

What patient identification and data matching issues do you find to be the most important as we move forward?

July #biometricchat Recap Including the Entire Chat Transcript

July's biometric tweet chat on biometric technology welcomes Steria Group to talk about public acceptance of biometric identification management technology

Transcript of our July 2013 #biometricchat tweet chat on biometric technology with guest @olemariuss from @steria

It was discovered that all of the tweets that originated from our guest on Thursday’s #biometricchat were not able to be seen by those who were participating. It appears that due to a technical glitch in tweet chat platform software, @olemariuss tweets to the questions posed to him during the chat were not actively posted to the hashtag and thus could not bee seen on any Twitter platforms or readers.

We are deeply sorry for this error, and would like to post the transcript of the chat here so those who weren’t able to make it or were sitting in on the chat and couldn’t see the guests tweets have the opportunity to learn from all of the great information our guest shared.

Here are a list of the questions, and our guest’s responses:

Question 1

@m2sys: How do you explain the dichotomy between public acceptance of biometrics for identity cards or passports and the use of biometrics to replace personal identification numbers (PINs)?

@olemariuss: A1: The dichotomy comes from organizations managing the                                 biometrics. Governments, with public trust, issue identity cards.

@olemariuss A1: A bank is more seen on as a private company out to make                              money. Not necessarily to protect identities

@olemariuss: A1: Within private companies the public has different views.

@olemariuss: A1: People will more easily provide their biometrics to what is                             seen on as high security companies (eg. banks, airlines).

@olemariuss: A1: People will more easily provide their biometrics to what is seen on as high security companies (eg. banks, airlines).

Question 2

@m2sys: While we see “civil liberties” and “privacy” as one of the obstacles to wider use of biometrics in the US, is that the same thing you are seeing in your European survey?

@olemariuss: A2: The survey does not cover this topic directly. Further, the public does not have thorough knowledge about the subject.

@olemariuss: A2: Data protection laws differ from country to country and is very different across Europe.

@olemariuss: A2: There has been a trend changing. Biometrics can be used as long as it is not uniquely connected to a person file.

@olemariuss: A2: Shortly put, biometrics can be used for authentication and not identification.

Question 3

@m2sys: One of the dynamics that appears to be evident is that while people want to guard their biometric data, if they can get to the head of the line (e.g. Clear Me airport security program) they are willing to give up their biometrics.  Can you comment on how convenience and faster transactions might impact the more pervasive use of biometrics?

@olemariuss: A3: This goes to show how low the threshold is for organizations to utilize biometrics in regards to public acceptance.

@olemariuss: A3: Most individuals tend to “forget” their privacy concerns if they see a personal gain by providing biometrics.

@olemariuss: A3: How the solution I set up technically is not the public’s concern as it is often out of their knowledge area.

@olemariuss: A3: Biometrics is still a bit “scary”. The usability is important to achieve adaptability of the wider public.

Question 4

@m2sys: Some country’s public sector organizations that have collected biometrics for a specific purpose are making them available for use by the private sector to prevent fraud, assure a person’s identity, etc.  Do you believe this is a trend we will see more of?

@olemariuss: A4: Within biometrics you often see the most seamless solutions when setting up in green-field markets.

@olemariuss: A4: I do believe that National ID documents will play a very important role in assuring a person’s identity.

@olemariuss: A4: If biometrics is used at all, it is often only on the card, and not in a central database.

@olemariuss: A4: More countries to bane way with successful implementations with proven results before we see this as a larger trend.

Question 5

@m2sys: How will “passive” biometrics like facial recognition, voice recognition and iris at a distance be accepted since it doesn’t require any specific actions by a person for it to be used?

@olemariuss: A5: When using passive biometrics it is important the public does not feel as they are under surveillance.

@olemariuss: A5: By being open and providing information about the solution where it is used acceptance can be easier to acquire.

Question 6

@m2sys: What strategies can biometric vendors deploy to help advance the public’s understanding of biometric identification that may help it to be more acceptable as a replacement for personal identification (PIN) numbers?

@olemariuss: A6: To acquire understanding, the first step is to “educate” organizations using biometrics to utilize it correctly.

@olemariuss: A6: Acceptance will come stepwise when more and more solutions prove a more convenient identification.

@olemariuss: A6: Increased security or fraud is not the big concern of the public as they do not see the effect in their daily tasks.

Question 7

@m2sys: What new or forthcoming biometric modalities (e.g. – heartbeat, thermal imaging, gait, DNA, etc.) do you predict has the best chance to become sustainable in the industry? Are there any specific modalities that you feel the public accepts more readily than others?

@olemariuss: A7: Adding new modalities to the market will be difficult. The biometrics already widely used can cover most use cases.

@olemariuss: A7: I believe the “passive” modalities have the most chance. These can be introduced without the public interaction.

@olemariuss: A7: Examples can be thermal imaging for crowd size calculations or gait for opening doors.

We hope that you found the information shared by during the chat to be helpful and we thank them for their time and lending their expertise to our monthly chat on biometric technology.

We will be announcing August’s #biometricchat tweet chat guest on this blog in the next 2 weeks. In the meantime, if you have an idea for a chat please email us at: marketing@m2sys.com

Topics for July’s #biometricchat on Biometric Technology with Steria Group (@steria)

July's biometric tweet chat on biometric technology welcomes Steria Group to talk about public acceptance of biometric identification management technology

July’s #biometricchat welcomes Steria Group (@Steria and @olemariuss) to talk about the results of their recent European survey on biometric technology.!

When: July 25, 2013 11:00 am EST, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST)

Where: twubs.com (hashtag #biometricchat)

What: Tweet chat on biometrics industry 

Topics: Results of recent European biometric public acceptance survey, the convenience vs. security of biometrics, USA vs. European view of how biometrics impacts privacy and civil liberties, “passive” biometrics, how vendors can advance public education of biometrics, viability of new biometric modalities

Here are the list of questions that we will cover during our tweet chat on biometric technology  tomorrow July 25th at 11 a.m. EDT (read this post on July’s #biometricchat for more details) with Steria Group (@steria) Representing Steria on the chat will be Ole Marius Steinkjer (@olemariuss):

  1. How do you explain the dichotomy between public acceptance of biometrics for identity cards or passports and the use of biometrics to replace personal identification numbers (PINs)?
  2. While we see “civil liberties” and “privacy” as one of the obstacles to wider use of biometrics in the US, is that the same thing you are seeing in your European survey?
  3. One of the dynamics that appears to be evident is that while people want to guard their biometric data, if they can get to the head of the line (e.g. Clear Me airport security program) they are willing to give up their biometrics.  Can you comment on how convenience and faster transactions might impact the more pervasive use of biometrics?
  4. Some country’s public sector organizations that have collected biometrics for a specific purpose are making them available for use by the private sector to prevent fraud, assure a person’s identity, etc.  Do you believe this is a trend we will see more of?
  5. How will “passive” biometrics like facial recognition, voice recognition and iris at a distance be accepted since it doesn’t require any specific actions by a person for it to be used?
  6. What strategies can biometric vendors deploy to help advance the public’s understanding of biometric identification that may help it to be more acceptable as a replacement for personal identification (PIN) numbers?
  7. What new or forthcoming biometric modalities (e.g. – heartbeat, thermal imaging, gait, DNA, etc.) do you predict has the best chance to become sustainable in the industry? Are there any specific modalities that you feel the public accepts more readily than others?

The biometric technology chat will take place on tomorrow at 11 am EDT, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST). Please join us and follow the discussion using twubs.com. This site will automatically fill in the chat hashtag at the end of all your tweets, no need to type #biometricchat for each tweet you send.

Don’t worry if you can’t make the chat tomorrow. We will be archiving the discussion and posting it here shortly afterwards. If you have any additional questions you would like to ask Ole Mariuss, please send an email to: marketing @m2sys.com

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you on July’s #biometricchat!

#biometricchat Tweet Chat on Biometric Technology Resumes in July

M2SYS Technology hosts a monthly tweet chat on biometric technology

We will resume the monthly tweet chat on biometric technology in July.

With vacations and travel schedules being quite hectic this time of year, we will be postponing our regularly scheduled monthly tweet chat on biometric technology (follow hashtag #biometricchat) until the month of July.

We will return the 2nd week of July with a new guest, new topic, and a great discussion on biometric technology!

If you have an idea for a topic for our monthly tweet chat on biometric technology, please email us at: marketing@m2sys.com with the topic and a suggested guest to interview and our editorial team will review your suggestion.

June's biometric tweet chat on biometric technology suspended until July!

June #biometricchat suspended until July.

Thank you for supporting our efforts to help open the lines of communication about biometric technology across the globe and encouraging more dialogue and discussion on the most pressing issues in the industry!

#biometricchat Biometric Technology Tweet Chat Recap with Guest Maxine Most

maxine most from Acuity Marketing was our guest on may''s tweet chat on biometric technology

Maxine Most from Acuity Marketing Intelligence was our guest for May’s tweet chat on biometric technology.

If you did not have the opportunity to participate in May’s tweet chat on biometric technology (hashtag #biometricchat on Twitter), you missed a great discussion on the industry with expert insight from this month’s guest Maxine Most from Acuity Marketing Intelligence (@cmaxmost on Twitter).

Among the various topics covered during the chat, Maxine addressed:

1. How biometric vendoirs can take a more active role in educating the public on misunderstandings about the technology to promote wider acceptance?

Maxine’s answer – “Be vigilant, refute any and all public statements by media, govt, tech vendors that present inaccuracies…This can be via press release, comments in online forums, social media, etc. Take responsibility to clarity misstatement.”

“deliver on the promise by creating user friendly solutions (human factors) that make users feel safe (privacy enhancing)”

(Read more of Maxine’s answers in the Storify chat transcript)

2. What are some of biometric vendor mistakes that could have been avoided and may have adversely affected the success of their technology?

Maxine’s answer – “Vendors fail to take responsibility for offering complete solutions as defined from the customer perspective.”

“Too focused on technology – no one really cares about technology, they care about solving problems.”

(Read more of Maxine’s answers in the Storify chat transcript)

3. What is your interpretation of recent biometric M&A activity and what types of trends can we expect to see in the near future?

Maxine’s answer – “My unconventional perspective, in many cases biometric companies, unable to achieve sustainable success on their own…re purchased by bigger companies that need the capabilities but are frustrated with incomplete solutions.”

(Read more of Maxine’s answers in the Storify chat transcript)

4. Will increased demand for biometric tech help open the door for its use in additional verticals? If so, which ones?

Maxine’s answer – “Verticals become increasingly irrelevant as the applications become more mobile device dependent – got an app for that?”

“No surprise mobile biometrics for consumer transaction drive adoption in FS, HC, Enterprise.”

“Also e-Gov, more for borders & immigration.”

(Read more of Maxine’s answers in the Storify chat transcript)

5. Is your prediction still true that private and public sector biometrics would generate the same amount of revenue by 2014?

Maxine’s answer – “No. Industry has not championed a well defined vision and aggressively pursued it…Instead acting as the tail of the dog.”

(Read more of Maxine’s answers in the Storify chat transcript)

6. What area of the world do you think holds the most potential for continued growth of biometric deployments?

Maxine’s answer – “Global opportunities vary by region. However, critical driver is the same -mobility, mobility, mobility.”

(Read more of Maxine’s answers in the Storify chat transcript)

We would like to thank Maxine for her time and expertise for May’s tweet chat on biometric technology and hope that you may have the chance to read the chat transcript for more details on the conversation. Visit Maxine over at her Web site – http://www.acuity-mi.com/index.php for more information on her products and services and stay tuned on our blog for the announcement of June’s guest for our monthly tweet chat on biometric technology!

Topics for May’s #biometricchat on Biometric Technology with Maxine Most (@cmaxmost)

May's biometric tweet chat will discuss the biometrics industry with Maxine Most.

May #biometricchat tweet chat features Maxine Most from Acuity Market Intelligence.

When: May 23, 2013 11:00 am EST, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST)

Where: tweetchat.com (hashtag #biometricchat)

What: Tweet chat on biometrics industry 

Topics: Public education on biometric technology, vendor mistakes when bringing products to market, recent Merger & Acquisition activity, additional markets for biometrics, private vs. public sector revenue growth,  global hot spots for continued biometrics industry growth

Here are the list of questions that we will cover during our tweet chat on biometric technology May 23rd at 11 a.m. EDT (read this post on May’s #biometricchat for more details) with Maxine Most (@cmaxmost):

1. How can biometric vendors take a more active role in educating the public on misunderstandings about the technology to promote wider acceptance?

2. What are some of the mistakes you have observed from biometric vendors taking products to market that could have been avoided or may have adversely affected the success of their solutions? What advice can you offer vendors who are researching and developing new products and solutions that can help them to be successful?

3. What is your interpretation of recent biometric M&A activity and what types of trends can we expect to see in the near future?

4. Will the increased demand for biometric technology help to open the door for its use in additional verticals? If so, what markets do you feel can benefit the most from the technology?

5. I remember some time ago you were predicting that the private sector and public sector would generate about the same amount of revenue by 2014.  Is that prediction still on target and what private sector markets to you see getting the most traction?

6. What area of the world do you feel holds the most potential for continued growth of biometric deployments and why?

The biometric technology chat will take place on May the 23rd at 11 am EDT, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST). Please join us and follow the discussion using tweetchat.com. This site will automatically fill in the chat hashtag at the end of all your tweets, no need to type #biometricchat for each tweet you send.

Don’t worry if you can’t make the chat on May the 23rd. We will be archiving the discussion and posting it here shortly afterwards. If you have any additional questions you would like to ask Maxine, please send an email to: marketing @m2sys.com

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you on May’s #biometricchat!

May #biometricchat Welcomes Maxine Most from Acuity Market Intelligence to Discuss Biometrics Industry

May's biometric tweet chat will discuss the biometrics industry with Maxine Most.

May #biometricchat tweet chat features Maxine Most from Acuity Market Intelligence.

When: May 23, 2013 11:00 am EST, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST)

Where: tweetchat.com (hashtag #biometricchat)

What: Tweet chat on biometrics industry 

Topics: Public education on biometric technology, vendor mistakes when bringing products to market, recent Merger & Acquisition activity, additional markets for biometrics, private vs. public sector revenue growth,  global hot spots for continued biometrics industry growth

We are pleased to announce that Maxine Most from Acuity Market Intelligence will be our guest for May’s tweet chat on biometric technology. Maxine is an internationally recognized biometrics industry consultant and Acuity Market Intelligence has built a stellar reputation in the Biometrics marketplace for quality, integrity, and innovative thought-leadership. For more than 10 years, Acuity has demonstrated an unrivaled ability to consistently provide accurate and reliable biometrics market intelligence.

Acuity continues to bring this unique perspective to the Biometrics industry through strategic consulting engagements, off-the-shelf and custom market research, conference presentations, industry publications, the eUpdate Newsletter, and Acuity’s most recent vehicles – Twitter and the eUpdate Blog.

Although we will be posting a list of questions and topics for the discussion next week here on the blog, we can provide a little foreshadowing of the chat by telling you that the focus of the conversation will be on:

  • Biometrics strategic market development
  • Maxine’s interpretation of industry mergers & acquisitions
  • What other markets could benefit from biometric technology
  • Private and public sector growth discrepancies
  • What areas of the world will continue to see strong growth for biometric deployments in the future

We will post a full list of the topics and questions here on this blog early next week. Have a question that you would like to ask Maxine? Drop us an email at marketing@m2sys.com and we will try and include that in the discussion. Please help us to spread the word about May’s #biometricchat tweet chat and please mark your calendar to save the date!

Topics for April’s #biometricchat on Biometric Technology with Zack Martin from Avisian Publications

April's biometric tweet chat will discuss the global growth of biometrics.

April #biometricchat tweet chat features Zack Martin from Avisian publications.

Here are the list of questions that we will cover during our tweet chat on biometric technology April 25th at 11 a.m. EDT (read this post on April’s #biometricchat for more details) with Zack Martin from Avisian (@Avisian):

  1. Can you explain how Avisian is structured and what topics your publications cover?
  2. Do you see the biometric technology private sector is growing as fast as the analysts are predicting (by 2017 private sector will be a majority of the biometrics market)?
  3. What do you believe are the biggest obstacles to biometrics becoming an integral part of society to prevent fraud, assure electors are who they claim to be, etc.?
  4. We have seen a lot of consolidation in the biometric technology industry; do you believe that will continue?
  5. How will mobile solutions change the market in the future?
  6. Will the recent experiment with using biometrics for retail payments in France developed by National Security and PayTango’s project at Carnegie Mellon ever translate into mainstream use of the technology for the average consumer?
  7. Which biometric modalities currently in testing and additional research and development do you believe stand the best chance to become legitimate hardware solutions in the near future?

The biometric technology chat will take place on April the 25th at 11 am EDT, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST). Please join us and follow the discussion using tweetchat.com. This site will automatically fill in the chat hashtag at the end of all your tweets, no need to type #biometricchat for each tweet you send.

Don’t worry if you can’t make the chat on April the 25th. We will be archiving the discussion and posting it here shortly afterwards. If you have any additional questions you would like to ask Zack, please send an email to: marketing @m2sys.com

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you on April’s #biometricchat!

April #biometricchat Welcomes Zack Martin from Avisian Publications to Discuss Growth of Global Biometrics Industry

April's biometric tweet chat will discuss the global growth of biometrics.

April #biometricchat tweet chat features Zack martin from Avisian publications.

When: April 25, 2013 11:00 am EST, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST)

Where: tweetchat.com (hashtag #biometricchat)

What: Tweet chat on growth of global biometrics industry

Topics: Global growth of biometrics, obstacles to continued growth, industry consolidation, mobile, biometrics in retail, new biometric modalities

Happy to announce today that April’s tweet chat on biometric technology is scheduled for 04/25 as we welcome Zack Martin, Editor at Avisian, a group of identity technology experts working alongside seasoned journalists, web and graphics professionals, and event coordinators creating a unique combination — coupling the technology insight of a leading consultancy with the communication capabilities of a high-end publishing and events firm.

We will be discussing several topics with Zack, most notably the prospects for growth in the global biometrics industry, what may be some obstacles to continued growth, industry consolidation, mobile biometrics for authentication and identification, biometrics for retail payments, and new biometric modalities and how soon we may see them in mainstream use.

We will post a full list of the topics and questions here on this blog early next week. Have a question that you would like to ask Zack? Drop us an email at marketing@m2sys.com and we will try and include that in the discussion. Please help us to spread the word about April’s #biometricchat tweet chat and please mark your calendar to save the date!

March #biometricchat Recap: A Conversation on Biometrics with Cyrille Bataller from Accenture

March's biometric tweet chat will discuss biometrics deployments in large scale capacities.

March #biometricchat tweet chat recap.

We had the pleasure of inviting Cyrille Bataller from Accenture as our guest for March’s #biometricchat tweet chat yesterday. There was a lot of material to cover in the short time we had scheduled for the chat (which started a few minutes late because of some technical difficulties) but we were able to learn a lot about the characteristics of large biometric deployments and how multi-modal biometrics helps to increase project accuracy plus updates on the European Visa Information System deployment,  the importance of fusing biographic attributes and fuzzy matching into the fusion equation, the importance of interoperability in deployments, and how civil liberties affect biometric deployments and why they may prohibit biometrics from wider adoption in commonwealth countries.

Some of the more important pieces of knowledge that Cyrille shared with us in the chat included:

On the use of multi-modal biometrics:

Multi-modal biometrics allow accuracy at scale. they also ensure resistance to fraud (hard to spoof multi-biometrics)”
“Multi-modal biometrics allow accuracy at scale. they also ensure resistance to fraud (hard to spoof multi-biometrics)”

On the topic of fuzzy matching into the fusion equation:

“Using the same solution to match across multimodal biometrics, on a record per record basis, is more powerful.”
“It is called score-level fusion – aggregating and comparing the match scores across all data elements – for each record.”

On the European Visa Information System:

“All 27 Schengen countries are introducing biometrics visas, capturing applicants’ fingerprints and face in consular posts.”
“By October 2014, all 27 Schengen countries will have switched to 100% biometric visas in consulates and at the border.”

On the importance of interoperability in biometric system deployments:

“There are two ways to look at interoperability: to ensure open loop operations, and to future-proof solutions.”
“Open loop operations clearly require interoperability, so each country can read passports from other countries etc.”
“But even for closed-loop solutions such as voting or bank customer ID, interoperability plays a role to prevent vendor lockin”

On the issue of civili liberties and privacy inhibiting biometric deployments in commonwealth countries:

Public acceptance of biometric solutions is directly linked to the benefits that people get from these solutions.”
“Essential to think about data privacy from the get go, to dispel myths and to educate about benefits. And to offer opt-in.”
“But indeed opt-in is key, as individuals’ sensitivity to privacy varies widely. There are additional measures such as privacy-by-design, invented by Anne Cavoukian, and privacy impact assessments, such as published by US-VISIT.”
“Biometrics, employed wisely, can enhance privacy, and help protect individuals’ identities.”
“The key is to help individuals conveniently assert their identity, while preserving their privacy and right to anonymity.”

A complete copy of the transcript can be found on our Storify account here: http://bit.ly/107l46Y

Special thanks to Cyrille for lending us his time for the chat and sharing information and knowledge about the topics. We will have information posted here soon on our next #biometricchat tweet chat, tentatively scheduled for mid-April.

If you have any idea for a chat topic, please drop an email to marketing@m2sys.com