February’s #biometricchat to Discuss Using Biometrics for Development

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February's #biometricchat covers the current state of biometrics and development in developing countries with guests from the Center for Global Development.
February’s #biometricchat covers the current state of biometrics and development in third world countries with special guests from the Center for Economic Development.

When: February 21, 2013 11:00 am EST, 8:00 am PST, 16:00 pm BST, 17:00 pm (CEST), 23:00 pm (SGT), 0:00 (JST)

Where: tweetchat.com (hashtag #biometricchat)

What: Tweet chat on the use of biometric identification in developing countries to help bridge the identity gap

Topics: How biometric identification helps to promote development, risks and challenges of using biometrics, emerging trends and their implications, and more.

Alan Gelb (aka @AlanHGelb) and Julia Clark (aka @juliamgclark) from the Center for Global Development recently published a working paper entitled “Identification for Development: The Biometrics Revolution” in which they examine the increased use of biometric identification in developing countries evaluating the advantages, limitations, and market conditions that can dictate deployment success or failure.

In their summary, they describe the paper as:

This paper surveys 160 cases where biometric identification has been used for economic, political, and social purposes in developing countries. About half of these cases have been supported by donors. Recognizing the need for more rigorous assessments and more open data on performance, the paper draws some conclusions about identification and development and the use of biometric technology. Some cases suggest large returns to its use, with potential gains in inclusion, efficiency, and governance. In others, costly technology has been ineffective or, combined with the formalization of identity, has increased the risk of exclusion.

One primary conclusion is that identification should be considered as a component of development policy, rather than being seen as just a cost on a program-by-program basis. Within such a strategic framework, countries and donors can work to close the identification gap, and in the process improve both inclusion and the efficiency of many programs.

Join us as we discuss Alan and Julia’s research and conclusions and ask them to look ahead and share their predictions on the future direction of biometric identification, especially as it applies to third world development.

Just in case you are interested in participating but are new to Tweet chats, please read this post which outlines the instructions and procedures. We hope that you will join us for the discussion on biometrics for development, and please help us to spread the word among your colleagues and friends.

Do you have any questions about biometrics and development that you would like to ask Alan or Julia? Just drop us an email at marketing@m2sys.com and we will try and include them in the chat.

Thanks, and hope to see you next Thursday, February the 21st at 11 a.m. EDT for the next #biometricchat tweet chat!

M2SYS Technology simplifies the development and deployment of biometric projects


John Trader is the Public Relations and Marketing Manager with M2SYS Technology, a recognized industry leader in biometric identity management technology. Headquartered in Atlanta, GA M2SYS Technology's mission is to pioneer the high-tech industry by delivering long-term value to customers, employees and partners through continued innovation and excellence in all aspects of our business. M2SYS continues to innovate, build and bring to market leading-edge biometrics solutions that revolutionize the industry and expand the applicability of biometrics technology in our marketplace. You can view their Web site at www.m2sys.com or contact them via e-mail at info@m2sys.com